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How to Hang Holiday Lights Without Damaging Your Roof

For many people, the holiday season wouldn’t be complete without hanging lights on the house. Not only does the final look add to the holiday spirit but the process of putting up the lights can be fun for the entire family. However, you shouldn’t get so caught up in the holiday spirit that you throw caution to the wind. If you don’t pay attention to some basic safety rules, you could damage the roof.

For example, you need to carefully inspect each string of lights to make sure there are no exposed wires or broken bulbs. You also need to make sure that the lights and extension cords are designed for outdoor use. Otherwise, you could be creating a fire hazard. The last thing you want to do during the festive season is to have to call a Greenville roofing company to schedule repairs. Let’s look at some of the other things you need to do to protect your roof even while you enjoy the festivities.

Don’t Do Anything that Will Put Holes in Your Roof

In your excitement to hang the lights, you may be tempted to put staples or nails in your shingles. These may be all you have on hand but it isn’t a good idea to use them. You may be able to staple the lights to your eaves but if you staple onto the actual roof, you’ll be creating holes where water can get in and damage the roof decking.

This is why it’s best to plan ahead before you actually get started on your project. Plastic clips are an excellent alternative to nails and staples. There are several types available so you’ll need to choose the right options for each area of your roof.  Plastic clips allow you to hang your lights without causing damage so you should definitely pay a visit to the hardware store if you haven’t already done so.

Don’t Add Too Much Weight to the Roof

Clips will work well as long as you don’t put too much weight on them. A string of lights is fine but avoid hanging large and heavy decorations from your gutters or eaves.  You also shouldn’t put anything heavy directly on the roof. A huge sleigh, snowman or Santa Claus decoration may sound fun but it’s best to place these types of items in the yard. If you put something weighty on the roof, you run the risk of damaging your shingles. If you must put candy cane and reindeer on the roof to complete your holiday decor, use light plastic.

Don’t Place Anything in or Near the Chimney

It may be cute to see Santa’s legs sticking out the chimney but it’s dangerous to put decorations in or near the chimney, especially if they are made of flammable materials. Just one stray ember could float up the chimney and start a fire on the roof. The holidays revolve heavily on décor but it’s not worth risking the safety of your home. If you’re really sold on depicting Santa Claus coming down the chimney, get a replica of a chimney and place it at the other end of the house.


Be Careful if You Walk on Your Roof


If you want your roof to last a long time, you should avoid walking on it. However, if you only go up there once a year, you shouldn’t cause too much damage. You’ll need to wear soft footwear, walk gently, and avoid walking on the shingles when direct sunlight is on the roof. If your house has a tile roof be sure to place your feet on the peaks and not valleys. That being said, it’s best if you can put up the lights while using a ladder and not step on the roof at all.

Contact Greenville Roofing to Discuss Your Roofing Needs

The holidays are upon us but our roofing contractors in Greenville, SC are here for you. If you need tips on how to safely install your holiday lights or you want your roof repaired before you decorate, we can help. If you’ve already installed your lights and you accidentally damaged your roof or gutters, don’t let it ruin your holidays. Call us and we’ll inspect the damage, identify the problems, and get your roof back in tip-top shape. Greenville Roofing offers a wide range of services including installation, repairs, and maintenance. Contact us today!

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